Category Archives: Noodles

Recipes of Noodle Dishes

Steamed Rice Roll (豬腸粉)

Steamed Rice Roll

Hearing the clanging sounds of Chinese scissors and smelling rice roll being steamed bring back childhood memories of eating this Memorable Dish on the side of the road. The street vendor lines a brown parchment-like paper on top of a metal dish and cuts each strip of rice roll perfectly for each mouthful. Then he drizzles hot oil and gives us the option of adding the amount of soy sauce we want. The sesame sauce and hoisin sauce are diluted perfectly so it allows easy drizzling over the top of the steamed rice roll. There’s hot sauce available as well. I love hot sauce normally but I usually don’t put any in my steamed rice roll. I think the hot sauce overpowers the yummy combination of the oil, soy sauce, hoisin and sesame sauce.

Growing up in the mid-80s Hong Kong, food hawker carts were still on the streets at that time. Now, all the street vendors have moved into mini-mall food courts or they actually have a store alongside on the street. Eating breakfast on the street was a regular thing to do. I remember some schools didn’t allow kids wearing school uniforms eating on the street because they didn’t want a bad reputation for their school. But we didn’t care, we ate on the streets anyways. It wasn’t like there was uniform police who arrested us 😛 .

Recently, I heard a snippet about steamed rice roll from a Chinese radio food show. He talked about an amazing steamed rice roll place being closed down in Hong Kong and people just loved eating the rice roll from that place. It was the magic of the sauce that kept bringing people back. Apparently the lady who owns the place told the radio announcer that she renders pork fat and mixes it with the hot oil. That’s their secret weapon to bring their customers back time and time again. (Oooops for the vegetarians/vegans who eat their steamed rolls and think it’s a vegetarian/vegan dish.)

Even with my non-pork fat oil version, I almost devoured the whole package of steamed rice rolls myself! I think it’s the texture of the rice roll mixed with the combination of sauces that heightens my sense of the umami taste. My kiddies love eating this steamed rice roll as well. It’s too bad that they won’t be able to experience eating this Memorable Dish like I did because food carts like this are no longer on the streets. Their memory of eating this would be being served at restaurants or at home.Steamed Rice Roll

Steamed Rice Roll (豬腸粉)

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 5 minutes

Total Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 package of Fresh Rice Roll (can be found at your local Chinese grocery store)
  • 1 tbsp Chinese Sesame Paste
  • 2 tbsp Hot Water
  • 2 tbsp Hoisin Sauce
  • 1 tbsp Hot Water
  • 1/4 cup Premium Soy Sauce
  • 1/4 cup Water
  • 2 tbsp Sugar
  • 1 tbsp Toasted Sesame Seeds
  • 1 tbsp Oil, heated

Preparation

  1. Make the sauce by diluting 1 tablespoon of Chinese sesame paste with 2 tablespoon of hot water and 2 tablespoon of hoisin sauce with 1 tablespoon of hot water. Set aside.
  2. In a small pot, heat 1/4 cup premium soy sauce, 1/4 cup water and 2 tablespoon of sugar until the sugar dissolves. Set aside.
  3. Cut the fresh rice roll into 1 inch pieces and place them on a metal or ceramic plate.
  4. To steam the rice rolls, put approximately 1-2 inches of water in a large pot and bring it to a boil.
  5. Once the water is boiled, place bamboo steamer on top and place plate inside steamer and cover.
  6. Steam until rice roll is heated through (5 minutes or longer depending on how fresh rice roll is or if it’s in the fridge).
  7. Drizzle heated oil, toasted sesame seeds and enough sauce and soy sauce to taste.

Notes

You can make your own toasted sesame seeds by placing raw seeds in a shallow pan and heating them gently on top of the stove. Mix and watch carefully because once it starts toasting, they can heat up pretty fast.

http://www.memorabledishes.com/steamed-rice-roll/

Chinese Fuzzy Squash and Pork Meatballs Stew

Chinese Fuzzy Squash and Pork Meatballs Stew

As an inexperienced gardener/farmer, last year I planted zucchinis that happened to overtake my small garden box. This year it was the Chinese fuzzy squash that took over the box. I didn’t get a chance to buy anything to plant and yet my garden box was full of crops. Between my father and my father-in-law, they bought me seedlings of tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, cucumbers, basil (which were in separate planters), peppers and Chinese fuzzy squash. I even had a sunflower growing in that box (don’t ask me how it got there.)

In that garden box, I got a few cucumbers, a few tomatoes, a fair amount of cherry tomatoes but the peppers never grew. However, the fuzzy squashes just keep on giving. My husband recently picked two ginormous squashes because I could never find them hidden underneath the big leaves. He even said there’s another small one growing right now (thanks to our mild weather this fall).

This Memorable Dish is one of my favourite childhood dishes. I remember my mom making it quite a bit. This dish is great for the kiddies because it’s brothy, noodle-ly and made with meatballs. What kid doesn’t love meatballs! Although they’re not too crazy about the squash part of the stew, they hesitantly eat it due to my daily propaganda of the importance of eating vegetables. This Chinese fuzzy squash and pork meatballs stew definitely brings me back warm, fuzzy and cozy memories 🙂 .Chinese Fuzzy Squash and Pork Meatballs Stew

Chinese Fuzzy Squash and Pork Meatballs Stew

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 40 minutes

Serving Size: 4-6

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds of Ground Pork
  • 1 tbsp of Soy Sauce
  • 1/2 tsp of Salt
  • 1/2 tsp of Sugar
  • 1 tsp of Cornstarch
  • 1/8 tsp of White Pepper
  • 1 tsp of Sesame Oil
  • 2 slices of Ginger
  • 1 Fuzzy Squash, cut into 2-inch, length-wise chunks
  • 2 cups Cellophane Noodles
  • 4 cups of Chicken Broth (add more if needed)
  • 1 tbsp of Oil
  • 1 sliced Green Onion for garnish

Preparation

  1. Marinate pork with soy sauce, salt, sugar, cornstarch, white pepper, sesame oil for at least 30 minutes.
  2. Reconstitute the dry cellophane noodles by soaking them in cold water.
  3. Shape pork into golfball sized meatballs or smaller and set aside.
  4. Heat 1 tbsp of oil in a large pot. Once the pot is heated, put 2 slices of ginger and stir fry along with the fuzzy squash for a bit until you get a bit of colour.
  5. Add the chicken broth and once it’s brought to a boil, slowly add the pork meatballs one by one.
  6. Cover and lower heat once the broth boils again.
  7. Cook for approximately 10 minutes until fuzzy squash is tender.
  8. Bring heat back up again and put cellophane noodles in the broth.
  9. Once it’s boiled again, turn heat off and garnish with green onions.

Notes

I cook my stew in a Chinese ceramic pot that is great for moving from stove to table 🙂 .

http://www.memorabledishes.com/chinese-fuzzy-squash-and-pork-meatballs-stew/

Alphabet Soup

Alphabet Soup

This Memorable Dish was requested by my second son because he was sick this past week. It was definitely a sick soup week for all. When one person in the family gets sick, at least two out of the five (but usually more) will also get sick. Luckily (or maybe unluckily) I never get sick, which means I am the one taking care of the sickies. Growing up Chinese, when we get sick, we eat congee such as my Century Egg and Pork Congee. We also avoid certain foods. For example, when we get a cough, we never eat oranges or drink cold drinks. We also make special drinks or soups to nourish ourselves when we’re sick. So on top of making the specially requested alphabet soup, I have also been making drinks and soups using Chinese herbs. But we’ll save special nourishing Chinese soups for another post. Now back to alphabet soup…

I love that the boys request certain foods depending on what mood they are in. They have equated soupy noodles as foods that they like to eat when they are sick. My second son requests special foods quite often. He has been requesting Spaghetti and Meatballs and macaroni and cheese and even offered to help me cook them because he loves these dishes so much. I love to get reminders on what to make from time to time. With busy weekdays, I often make my usual go-to dishes (some kind of meat/fish with rice and veggies). It’s nice to hear special requests because that means they enjoy the food I make for them 🙂 .

When I told the boys that I’m making Alphabet Soup, they all cheered. Sickies and non-sickies alike enjoy this Memorable Dish. Even though you could make this soup with any shaped pasta, using the alphabet pasta was extra special to them. They always ask for seconds for this simple and quick dish. I don’t know why I don’t make it more often because this dish really makes them so happy! Then again, if I make it often, it might not be so special afterall 😉 .Alphabet Soup

Alphabet Soup

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 20 minutes

Serving Size: 1

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup of cooked alphabet pasta
  • 1/2 cup diced Ham (or whatever leftover meats you have on hand, I’m using turkey Kolbassa this time)
  • 1/2 cup frozen Corn (defrosted)
  • 2 cups Chicken Broth (Homemade or your favourite store-bought brand)
  • Splash of Vegetable Oil
  • Salt and White Pepper to taste

Preparation

  1. Prepare alphabet pasta according to package instructions.
  2. Drain pasta in colander, add vegetable oil and mix to prevent from sticking.
  3. Bring the chicken broth to a boil and add pasta, ham, and corn.
  4. Once the broth boils again, it’s ready to serve.
http://www.memorabledishes.com/alphabet-soup/

Ramen Noodles

Ramen Noodles

As the weather is getting cooler, I crave for a bowl of hot ramen noodles. Ramen noodles – not the fancy kind you eat at Japanese restaurants where they brew the broth with pork bone and meat for hours. But the instant kind. Every Asian household always has instant ramen noodles stocked up in their pantry at all times. Thus, instant ramen noodles should be a Memorable Dish for all Asians.

Instant ramen noodles is a comfort food to many Asians growing up. We know it’s not the healthiest thing on earth but we just love it. Asians don’t just eat the plain ramen noodles right out of a package but have extra add-ons to make the noodles extra yummy. Plus, if you are making them for your friends and family, it creates the illusion that you made some effort in cooking this dish and not just boiling instant noodles.

I personally blanch the noodles and rinse it with cold water and then reheat the noodles with the broth. If you don’t want to do that, just cook the ramen according to the package. I happen to have some of my homemade leftover Chinese BBQ Pork so I put that, veggies and a fried egg as my toppings. Put your favourite ingredients on your ramen and enjoy!
Ramen Noodles

Ramen Noodles

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 15 minutes

Serving Size: 1

Ingredients

  • 1 pack instant Ramen
  • Slices of leftover or fresh meat (chicken, beef, pork, etc.)
  • Fresh Vegetables
  • Fried Egg
  • Slices of Scallions (optional)

Preparation

  1. Boil the ramen according to the package.
  2. Top with cooked meat, vegetables, fried egg, scallions or any desired topping.
  3. Eat and enjoy!
http://www.memorabledishes.com/ramen-noodles/

Ginger Scallion Cold Noodles

Picnic food for Chinese families, at least for our family, is cold noodles. Cold noodles is a relative term because Chinese people like their food super hot. So “cold” noodles can also mean room temperature for us. I remember eating this Memorable Dish at picnics with my family. We would make this simple dish to take along side with my mom’s salty poached chicken wings (I’ll leave that recipe for another post). It’s basically chicken wings that are poached in salty water and perfumed with star anise. These chicken wings can also be served cold, hence another perfect food for picnics.

Ginger scallion cold noodles is also my mother’s go-to dish to make when we do our long drives to the States. These cold noodles definitely remind me of summer. Having picnics and BBQs outside with families and friends. I love the combination of ginger and scallions sizzled in hot oil mixed with soy and oyster sauce. This is my favourite sauce of all time. I can just eat the sauce all by itself!

This Memorable Dish is so easy and versatile. You can use any type of noodles you have on hand. This time, I am using fresh store-bought egg noodles. I usually have Chinese wheat or soba noodles in my pantry and use those to make my cold noodles. I remember my mom even used spaghetti when we didn’t have any Asian noodles in the house. It turned out just as tasty!

Ginger Scallion Cold Noodles

Ginger Scallion Cold Noodles

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 20 minutes

Serving Size: 4

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup Ginger, julienne
  • 2 cups Scallions, julienne (whites and green separated)
  • 1/4 Cup Vegetable Oil
  • 2 tbsp low sodium Soy Sauce
  • 2 tbsp Oyster Sauce
  • 1 tbsp Sesame Oil
  • 1 lb Noodles

Preparation

  1. Heat oil in a small pot. Test if the oil is hot enough by putting a piece of your ginger in. If it sizzles, put the rest of the ginger in and mix.
  2. Then put the white parts of the scallions in and mix.
  3. Finally put the green parts of the scallions in and mix. Turn off heat.
  4. Put the soy and oyster sauce in and mix. Set aside.
  5. Prepare noodles according to the package. Cook them until al dente.
  6. Drain noodles but do not rinse in cold water.
  7. Put noodles in large bowl and mix with sesame oil to prevent them from sticking.
  8. Then add your ginger, scallions, soy and oyster sauce mixture.
  9. Toss noodles. Serve at room temperature or chill to serve cold.

Notes

Adjust your seasonings according to the type of noodles you use. Depending on the type of noodles used, the sauce adheres to them differently.

http://www.memorabledishes.com/ginger-scallion-cold-noodles/

Tuna Casserole

Tuna Casserole

You’d be surprised that I run out of food at my house. Yes, I do cook a lot but I try to buy fresh food as much as possible. I have nothing against the freezer. I do buy meat in bulk and freeze it. I make baby food and freeze it. And I buy frozen veggies and other frozen instant products when I’m in a food jam. But on one cold winter’s day, I actually had no meat in the freezer. I didn’t want to venture out to the grocery store in deep-freeze weather. What to do?…What can I make?…Tuna casserole!

Since I didn’t grow up with a North American mother, tuna casserole was not a childhood dish of mine. I don’t quite remember when I was first introduced to it. I might’ve eaten it at a friend’s house or I might’ve made it by myself since it’s such an easy dish to whip up. I didn’t discover tuna casserole until I was much older.

This seems like a dish of yesteryear when everyone today is eating designer foods. But there’s a comfort and simplicity to this dish. A can of cream of mushroom soup, cans of tuna and egg noodles (I use whole wheat rotini pasta). I also use grated cheese as a topping instead of the usual bread crumb topping I’ve seen in other recipes.

Whether you’ve had tuna casserole while growing up or never had it, give it a try! You can stock the items in your pantry and freezer and cook it in a pinch. Or like me, when you run out of meat in the house!

The first time I served this dish for the kids, they exclaimed, “We used to have this at daycare!” That was heartwarming to hear that they recollect eating this Memorable Dish at daycare where the ladies who cared for them were like family.

Tuna Casserole

Tuna Casserole

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Serving Size: 4

Ingredients

  • 1 box whole wheat Rotini Pasta (375 g)
  • 1 can Cream of Mushroom Soup
  • 1 cup Milk
  • 2 cans Tuna (7 oz can)
  • 2 cups frozen mixed Vegetables
  • 2 tsp Olive Oil
  • 1 cup grated Cheddar Cheese
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan Cheese

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
  2. Boil the pasta based on the instructions found on the package.
  3. Drain the pasta into a colander and mix with olive oil to prevent from sticking.
  4. In a large bowl, mix the mushroom soup, milk, tuna (drain the liquid) and vegetables together.
  5. Put the pasta into the mixture and mix until everything is combined.
  6. Pour tuna mixture and pasta into a baking dish and top with cheeses.
  7. Bake for 20 minutes or until pasta is bubbling.
http://www.memorabledishes.com/tuna-casserole/

Circle of Food – Peking Duck Noodle Soup

My kids love eating at food courts inside of Chinese malls. I guess they love eating in any food court for that matter. They get very excited because it’s a treat and there are lots of places to choose from. What makes the Chinese food courts unique is the fact that they are all individually-owned. It’s a nice break from the franchised restaurants that we are used to at regular malls. It almost feels like we are eating on the streets filled with different food vendors, but in an enclosed and comfortable seating environment.

We often order dishes from different shops so we get to try everything. Since being a parent with young kids, I’ve ordered foods that the kids would eat, but not necessarily what I like to eat. Just the other evening, I went to the Chinese food court with my kids and my mom. As always, I ordered something the kids wanted to eat – fried noodles. I didn’t really want that but ordered it anyways. My mom ended up ordering what I normally like to eat – Peking Duck Noodle Soup. Maybe she wanted to eat that but I got a feeling she ordered it because of me 🙂

This brought back memories of when my mom and I were on a plane ride flying to Hong Kong. I loved that you got to choose between Western or Chinese entrées. For breakfast, there was a choice between congee or omelette. I ordered the omelette and my mom ordered the congee. I took a bite of the omelette and didn’t like it. Without a second thought, my mom gave me her congee. (Just so you know, I was a full-grown adult when it happened). I just voiced my dislike for the omelette and she gave me the congee right away!

I do the same for the kids now. I eat their food when they don’t finish it or I trade with them if they don’t like something. It’s like the circle of life or what I’d like to call – the circle of food. Parents always put their kids’ needs first no matter how old they are.

Just so you know, I have not attempted to make Peking duck at home. Even if I did, it would not taste the same as the ones you’d find at your typical Chinese BBQ shop. The method, technique, equipment and all that is involved in making a Peking duck is an art form. You can find Peking ducks sold at Chinese BBQ shops, Chinese restaurants that specialize in BBQ, or at select Chinese grocery stores. Once you buy your Peking duck, this dish is super easy to prepare and very comforting to eat.

Peking Duck Noodle Soup

Peking Duck Noodle Soup

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 35 minutes

Serving Size: 4

Ingredients

  • 1/2 Roasted Peking Duck*
  • 1 package of Jiang Xi Rice Vermicelli
  • 8 small stalks of Shanghai Bok Choy (Wash and cut in half.)
  • 5 cups of homemade Chicken Stock or store-bought Chicken Broth
  • 2 slices of Ginger
  • 2 cloves of whole Garlic
  • 2 stalks of Green Onion (Use the white part to infuse the broth and thinly slice the green parts as garnish.)
  • *You can buy ½ or whole roasted Peking ducks at Chinese BBQ shops. Don’t forget to ask for extra plum sauce.

Preparation

  1. Boil the vermicelli based on the instructions found on the package.
  2. Drain the vermicelli into a colander and rinse it with cold water.
  3. Put ginger, garlic, white parts of the green onion into the stock/broth and bring it to a boil. (You can take them out after the broth has been infused with these flavours.)
  4. Once the broth is boiled, add the Shanghai bok choy and boil for a minute or so.
  5. Then add the cooked vermicelli.
  6. Once the broth is boiling again. Turn off heat.
  7. Divide up the noodles and bok choy into bowls. Top with broth and sprinkle sliced green onions on the top.
  8. You can place the Peking duck on top of the noodles or you can place them on the side.

Notes

Note #1: If you cannot find Jiang Xi Rice Vermicelli, use whatever rice vermicelli is available at your grocery store. Alternatively, you can always use any type of egg noodles as well.

Note #2: From my package of Jiang Xi Rice Vermicelli, it says to cook for 6-8 minutes. I have to cook them for 10-12 minutes for them to be al dente to soft. Test them out before draining the vermicelli to get the right consistency.

Note #3: If you cannot find Shanghai bok choy, you can use baby bok choy or any type of vegetable that you like.

http://www.memorabledishes.com/peking-duck-noodle-soup/

Jiang Xi Rice Vermicelli

Jiang Xi Rice Vermicelli

 

Macaroni Soup with Ham

Macaroni Soup with Ham

I love Macaroni Soup. My mom used to make it for us when we were kids. I don’t quite recall but I think she used to make it specifically when we were sick. But it was definitely a favourite childhood Memorable Dish of mine. I used to suck on the macaroni tube when it was in my mouth to drink the soup that was trapped in there. What am I saying? I still do it now! I just remember having a lot of fun eating it.

I did a little research and have come to realize that this is a Hong Kong-Western style dish! I thought everyone grew up eating this. In Hong Kong, Macaroni soup with ham is usually eaten for breakfast or lunch. When my kids are sick, the first thing I think of making them is macaroni soup. It’s easy to make, brothy, warm and so yummy to eat.

This is a great alternative to macaroni cheese and a great dish to make for the kiddies. It covers all the basic food groups – carbs, proteins and veggies. I’m sure this Memorable Dish will please children anywhere!

It’s super easy to make when you have everything on hand. It makes a great one-dish meal for children and adults alike. Have this Memorable Dish for breakfast and pretend you are at a Hong Kong-Western style café!

Macaroni Soup with Ham

Macaroni Soup with Ham

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 20 minutes

Serving Size: 1

Ingredients

  • 1 cup of cooked Macaroni pasta
  • 1/2 cup diced Ham
  • 1/2 cup frozen Corn, Peas, Carrot mix (defrosted)
  • 2 cups Chicken Broth (Homemade or your favourite store-bought brand)
  • Splash of Vegetable Oil
  • Salt and White Pepper to taste

Preparation

  1. Prepare macaroni pasta according to package instructions.
  2. Drain macaroni in colander, add vegetable oil and mix to prevent from sticking.
  3. Bring the chicken broth to a boil and add macaroni, ham, and vegetables.
  4. Once the broth boils again, it’s ready to serve.
http://www.memorabledishes.com/macaroni-soup-with-ham/

Chicken Crunchy Chow Mein

Chicken Crunchy Chow Mein

Who doesn’t love crunchy chow mein that you order from Chinese take out restaurants? It’s deceiving how fattening those skinny crunchy noodles are. Believe it or not, they are deep fried. I know – shocking isn’t it?

I for one, LOVE the crunchy chow mein that I order from Chinese restaurants. The meat and sauce on top of those crunchy noodles – It’s a perfect sensation in your mouth when biting into the saucy part of the noodles combined with the crunchy part.

This Chicken Crunchy Chow Mein is definitely one of my favourite memorable go-to dishes. Super-easy, super-delicious, and super-impressive! I’ve made it for my own parties and brought it as a potluck dish to friends’ houses.

I wanted to create super crunchy noodles without the added fat. So I figured out baking the noodles with a little bit of oil can create the same effect. Here, I will show you how I make it. This is my secret passed onto you 😉 Your friends and family will be impressed that you can create restaurant-quality Crunchy Chow Mein from home.

I think this dish could be one of my friends’ most Memorable Dishes of mine. They are always shocked that it’s not bought from a Chinese restaurant. Yes, it’s that good!

Chicken Crunchy Chow Mein

Chicken Crunchy Chow Mein

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 60 minutes

Serving Size: 4-6

Ingredients

  • 2 boneless, skinless sliced Chicken Breasts (approximately 8 oz. each)
  • 1 tbsp of low sodium Soy Sauce
  • 1 tsp Sugar
  • 1 tsp Cornstarch
  • 1 tsp Chinese Cooking Wine (optional)
  • 2 cloves minced Garlic
  • 1 tsp of minced Ginger
  • 2 tbsp of Oyster Sauce
  • ½ cup of Chicken Broth or Water
  • 1 lb Bean Sprouts
  • 1 ½ cup of julienned Carrots
  • 1 ½ cup of julienned Snow Peas or Sugar Snap Peas (trimmed)
  • ½ tsp of Salt
  • 1 Package Egg Noodles
  • Vegetable Oil (2 tbsp for noodles, 2 tsp for vegetables, 2 tsp for chicken)
  • 2 tsp Cornstarch
  • 2 tbsp Water

Preparation

  1. Marinate chicken with soy sauce, sugar, cornstarch, and cooking wine for at least 30 minutes in refrigerator.
  2. For Noodles Preparation
  3. Preheat oven to 400°F.
  4. Put egg noodles in a large stainless steel bowl.
  5. Boil enough water to cover the noodles in the bowl.
  6. Once the water is boiled, pour it on the noodles.
  7. Loosen the noodles with a fork and let them sit for 1 minute.
  8. Drain noodles out thoroughly with a colander and pat dry with paper towel.
  9. Line baking sheet with parchment paper.
  10. Spread 1 tbsp of vegetable oil on the bottom of the lined baking sheet.
  11. Put noodles on oiled baking sheet.
  12. Then pour another 1 tbsp of vegetable oil on top of the noodles and mix.
  13. Bake for 10-15 minutes then flip the noodles over and bake it for another 10-15 minutes. (It depends on how crunchy you want them. I like them extra crunchy 🙂
  14. Set aside.
  15. For Vegetables and Chicken Preparation
  16. Heat 2 tsp of oil in wok or large frying pan.
  17. Fry up carrots and cook for a few minutes, then add snow peas and lastly the bean sprouts.
  18. Cook vegetables until tender but still have their crunch.
  19. Set vegetables aside.
  20. Using the same wok/frying pan, heat 2 tsp of oil and sauté the minced garlic and ginger.
  21. Add marinated chicken to the wok and cook until chicken is done.
  22. Add chicken broth/water and oyster sauce.
  23. Add vegetables back into the wok/frying pan and cook until everything is mixed in.
  24. Scoop chicken and vegetable mixture onto the crunchy noodles and leave liquid in the wok/frying pan.
  25. Mix 2 tsp of cornstarch with 2 tbsp of water into a small bowl.
  26. Then pour cornstarch mixture into sauce until thickens.
  27. Pour the rest of the sauce onto noodles & meat mixture.
http://www.memorabledishes.com/chicken-crunchy-chow-mein/
Chicken Crunchy Chow Mein - 3 pix

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons